A deep-dive with Zevvy, our longstanding test drive vehicle

A deep-dive with Zevvy, our longstanding test drive vehicle

A deep-dive with Zevvy, our longstanding test drive vehicle

If you’ve taken an electric vehicle (EV) test drive with Next Ride, chances are you’ve driven Zevvy, our 2019 Chevrolet Bolt.

Even if you haven’t given Zevvy a drive, you’ve probably seen it at events filled to the brim with all our supplies.

After four years offering Nova Scotians the chance to feel the thrill of driving electric, the team’s sharing some of our favourite highlights about the car that’s been here from the start with Next Ride.

Zevvy’s impact in numbers

In four years of test drives and tours around Nova Scotia, Zevvy has racked up an impressive set of stats. Zevvy’s odometer currently sits at 48,000 kilometres. That’s the equivalent of driving from Yarmouth to the very tip of Cape Breton 82 times!

The cost of that mileage? Zevvy mainly charges in our Dartmouth office with some top ups from Level 3 chargers on longer journeys. We estimate that the total cost to charge our beloved colleague since they’ve joined Next Ride is around $1,800—seems like a steal of a deal, doesn’t it?

It’s hard to pinpoint the exact number of people that have driven Zevvy, but we know more than 10,000 people have taken an EV test drive with Next Ride – we suspect Zevvy was involved for quite a lot of those.  

How Zevvy helps our Next Ride team

Don’t let Zevvy’s size fool you!  Clean’s Transportation Engagement Officer, Sondra McAllister, says one of the Bolt’s best features is that it’s a compact hatchback that’s very practical for Next Ride events.

“It is deceivingly spacious and can fit all our gear into the back of it, including our 10×10 foot tent, which blew my mind when I first started with the team,” said McAllister. “Zevvy has a great range, with 418 km on one charge, making it a very reliable EV for our more rural events.”

Colin Robar, Clean’s Electric Vehicle Engagement Officer calls Zevvy “the underrated star of Next Ride”. He knows first-hand what a great car it is for teaching people about driving electric.

“The flashy EVs get people to the events, but the moment people test drive Zevvy is when they truly get sold on the idea of owning an EV,” shares Robar. “Zevvy is just so much fun, so approachable and really drives home the joy of driving electric.”

If you have questions about EVs and want to get behind the wheel, schedule your test drive today with our Next Ride team.

Feel the thrill of driving electric

We’re adding new events every day!

Electrify Rebate program

Up to $8000 in Provincial and Federal rebates exist for qualifying electric vehicles.

Debunking the myth that EVs only come in sedans

Debunking the myth that EVs only come in sedans

Debunking the myth that EVs only come in sedans

Have you heard people saying that electric vehicles only come in sedans?

Maybe, you think that Teslas are the only electric vehicles on the market? These are just two of the many common misconceptions around the versatility of EVs. The truth is—there’s an EV for just about everything!

EVs were originally released in the form of small and compact sedans but they have since evolved to larger sedans, SUVs, trucks, hatchbacks and even e-bikes! You’ll find EVs on farms, in your neighbour’s driveway, in company fleets and everywhere in between. There are also electric tractors and pickup trucks that farmers worldwide are using to revolutionize their operations and reduce their fuel expenses over the long term.

EVs even work for large families. Need some extra space or leg room for your passengers? Models such as the Mitsubishi Outlander PHEV or the Hyundai Ioniq 5, might just do the trick.

Maybe you like to travel light and prefer a small, trendy car? Well, you’ve guessed it! There is an EV for that purpose too, like the Chevy Bolt or the Mini Cooper SE3.

Perhaps you’re looking for a higher end, luxury experience, then a Tesla may be for you. Some EVs even allow you to camp in them like the Nissan Pop-Top Electric Campervans and the Volkswagen Type 20.   Who doesn’t love a multifaceted vehicle? Have we shared enough that you believe that EVs are so much more than just sedans?

As electric technology develops and innovates this will continue to impact the evolution of EV models. To learn more about current EVs that qualify for provincial and federal rebates visit  EV Assist.

Feel the thrill of driving electric

We’re adding new events every day!

Electrify Rebate program

Up to $8000 in Provincial and Federal rebates exist for qualifying electric vehicles.

The difference between gas power and EV batteries

The difference between gas power and EV batteries

The difference between gas power and electric vehicle batteries

Everything you need to know about how an EV is powered.

You might have already heard about the many advantages EVs enjoy over gas cars, such as their environmental benefits and eligibility for rebates. What you may not know about is how an EV battery works, what it’s made of and how it compares to the more familiar battery of a gas-powered car.

Keep reading to find out:

How EV batteries work

A battery is made up of one of more cells and individual battery cells are connected to each other and monitored by a dedicated electronic circuit.

In an EV, the battery produces electricity which directly powers the vehicle’s systems. Unlike disposable alkaline batteries, which are used in flashlights and remote controls, EV batteries are rechargeable and can be used for many years.

What EV batteries are made of

The chemistry of an EV battery varies among manufacturers. However, there are three main types of rechargeable batteries:

  • Lead-acid batteries, which were invented in, and have been used since, the 19th century.
  • Nickel metal hydride (NiMH) batteries, which have seen commercial use since the 1980s.
  • Lithium-ion (Li-ion) batteries, which came into commercial use in the 1990s. There are also lithium-ion polymer batteries, which are a variation of lithium-ion batteries.

How batteries in EVs compare to batteries in gas-powered vehicles

In an EV, the battery is located on the bottom, centered between the wheels.  There are two separate batteries—12-Volt auxiliary batteries that powers a vehicle’s accessories and, traction battery packs that store electricity for use by the traction motor.

EVs also have thermal cooling systems to keep the battery at an optimal temperature. They also have internal computers and converters to monitor the intake of electricity. Their batteries are easy to charge by plugging in any ordinary outlet. You can find out more about EV charging by watching out our video.

In gas-powered vehicles, batteries are usually located just under the hood. The main purpose of the batteries is to start the engine and power vehicle electronics/accessories. When the battery of a gas-powered car dies, it is more difficult to charge than in an EV.

Now you know more about EV batteries and how they compare to those in gas-powered cars! To learn more about EVs, sign up for a test drive with one of our experts at Next Ride.

Feel the thrill of driving electric

We’re adding new events every day!

Electrify Rebate program

Up to $8000 in Provincial and Federal rebates exist for qualifying electric vehicles.

The difference between gas and electric motors

The difference between gas and electric motors

The difference between gas and electric motors

Everything you need to know about EV motors!

There are some obvious differences between the engines that power gas cars and the motors in electric vehicles (EVs). Gas-powered vehicles have an internal-combustion engine (ICE) that gets energy from a fuel tank, whereas EVs have a motor which gets its energy from a traction battery pack located at the front or the rear of the vehicle.

But how do the two differ in terms of maintenance costs and energy efficiency? Let’s dig into it:

Maintenance costs

ICE engines contain over 2000 moving parts, contributing to high maintenance costs over total ownership. All that moving means more repairs and replacements for those parts. The motor in EVs have fewer than 40 moving parts, greatly alleviating maintenance costs.

Energy efficiency

Electric motors are much more efficient than internal combustion engines. Their engines use roughly 12-30 per cent of the energy to move vehicle, while the rest is lost as heat. In comparison, electric motors use upwards of 90 per cent of the energy in the battery.

Additionally, regenerative braking technology helps maximize the efficiency of an EV. Often described as one-pedal driving, when the driver eases off the accelerator, the brakes convert the kinetic energy (motion of the vehicle) into electricity and store it in the batteries.

Interested in learning more? Book an EV test drive with one of our experts at Next Ride – they’ll tell you all about it!

Feel the thrill of driving electric

We’re adding new events every day!

Electrify Rebate program

Up to $8000 in Provincial and Federal rebates exist for qualifying electric vehicles.

What do people think about electric vehicle range?

What do people think about electric vehicle range?

What do people think about electric vehicle range?

“How far can you go in an electric vehicle?”

That’s one of the most common questions our Next Ride gets asked at our electric vehicle test drive  events, but a recent survey from CAA has revealed that range anxiety fades over time.

According to CAA, over 66 per cent of current EV owners said a perceived lack of range was a key concern before they bought their car. After owning an EV for a while, only 30 per cent of survey respondents still worry about range.

What do test drive attendees say?

Much like the survey respondents, Nova Scotians who go for test drives with us are also interested in a vehicle’s range. Brendan Piper, one of our electric vehicle engagement specialists, has spent years driving EVs around the province and helping people learn more about them.  

 “Once I remind drivers how infrequently most people travel three to four hours on the highway without stopping, I generally see them relax more on range as a key concern,” he says.

What advice do our experts have?

Our EV experts – who you might have met at a test drive – have learned a lot about the best way to manage an electric vehicle’s range. Next Ride EV Engagement Specialist, Sondra McAllister encourages drivers to make use of charging apps like PlugShare when planning routes on longer road trips.

“It lets you see if someone is using a charger,” said McAllister. “And PlugShare allows users to report on any charging issues as they arise for others to see.”

McAllister also shared that another helpful tip for people to track how much they drive in a week. “Most people drive much less than they think they do,” she added.

Electric vehicle range is always improving, and it’s common for current models to do between 300 and 500 kilometers on a single charge depending on the make and model.

If you have questions about EVs and how they could fit your lifestyle, why not book a test drive? Schedule yours today with our Next Ride team and ask the experts.

Feel the thrill of driving electric

We’re adding new events every day!

Electrify Rebate program

Up to $8000 in Provincial and Federal rebates exist for qualifying electric vehicles.